Phyllis Shallman -Understanding Generation X

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Every generation over the last hundred years has witnessed rapid changes.

But few have been caught in the crossfire of change quite like Generation X. Sandwiched between two larger generations, the folks born between 1965 and 1976 have seen an iron curtain fall, two major wars, a digital revolution, a global financial crisis, and now a world-shattering pandemic. Bridging the gap between so many stages of history has fashioned their perspective and financial health. Here’s a guide to understanding Generation X!

The numbers
Generation X holds surprisingly little wealth. They account for only 16% of the nation’s wealth, while Baby Boomers hold 56%.(1) Debt is also rampant among Gen-Xers, with an average outstanding debt of $136,869.(2) That’s higher than any other generation—and has only increased over the past few years.(3) None of this seems to slow down their non-essential spending, which is also greater than their parents and children.(4) And they’re more reluctant than other generations to seek help from a financial advisor.(5)

Attitudes and anxieties
These pressures have shaped the attitudes and outlooks of Gen-Xers. They’re about as stressed as Millennials when it comes to debt, with a focus on credit cards instead of student loans.(6) But there’s more to it than just stress. Generation X is incredibly hard on itself. 41% would rate their financial health as not very good to not good at all. 43% think their finances are much worse off than their peers’, and half think they earn less.

Gen-X’s outlook on retirement doesn’t line up with previous generations. They’re not particularly prepared; pre-pandemic, they had saved about $35,000 for retirement. Many plan on cutting costs in order to save, but they’re estimated to be the first generation that’s less prepared for retirement than their parents.(7) No wonder most plan on working through their golden years!(8)

The Sandwich Effect
There are several reasons for the dire straits of many Gen-Xers. They endured the financial crisis of 2008, and before that the dot com bubble of 2000, and now they find themselves in the midst of a pandemic-fueled recession. But that’s not all. They’re currently a bridge generation. They have retiring parents to care for (Baby Boomers) and young adult children they’ve had to support (Millennials). Every generation has to contend with this sandwiching effect at some point, but it’s proven particularly difficult for the Gen-Xers.

There’s no doubt that Generation X faces particularly serious challenges. The real question is what’s next for the bridge generation? Where will they find the financial tools to achieve peace of mind for retirement?

(1) https://www.investopedia.com/terms/g/generation-x-genx.asp

(2) https://www.lendingtree.com/personal/changes-to-each-generations-debt/

(3) https://www.marketwatch.com/story/all-the-ways-gen-x-is-financially-wrecked-2019-05-15

(4) https://www.marketwatch.com/story/all-the-ways-gen-x-is-financially-wrecked-2019-05-15

(5) https://www.investopedia.com/terms/g/generation-x-genx.asp

(6) https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/millennials-gen-x-money-stresses-retirement-savings-2019-10

(7) https://www.lifehealth.com/gen-x-deep-dive-financial-stress/

(8) https://www.aarp.org/money/credit-loans-debt/info-2015/gen-x-interesting-finance-facts.html#:~:text=The%20typical%20member%20of%20Generation,debt%20of%20%2488%2C313%20per%20adult.

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